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Thread: modeling FRPVE model for biological tissue

  1. #1
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    Jun 2019
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    Karnataka,India
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    Post modeling FRPVE model for biological tissue

    I want to model fiber reinforced poroviscoelastic (FRPVE) model for cartilage tissue for my knee model. Could anyone help me to proceed with this. I have found transversely isotropic hyper elastic material model as a fiberous model. But i couldn't able to find any models for performing the above so.

    Thanking in advance
    Vaishakh R
    PhD Research Scholar
    NITK, India

  2. #2
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    Dec 2007
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    Hi Vaishakh,

    There are are two options for modeling FRPVE materials:

    1) The <solid> component of a <biphasic> material may be selected to be of type "viscoelastic". The <elastic> component of this "viscoelastic" solid may be a "solid mixture" that includes two <solid> components, one which represents the ground matrix and another that could represent a fiber model. In this option, the viscoelasticity applies equally to all the components of the "solid mixture".

    2) The <solid> component of a <biphasic> material may be selected to be of type "solid mixture". The mixture may consist of multiple <solid> components, which may be of type "viscoelastic". For example, you could have a <solid> which is an elastic material representing the ground matrix, and another <solid> which is of type "viscoelastic", whose <elastic> material is a fiber type. In this example, the fiber material is viscoelastic. Another example is to make each <solid> material in the mixture be "viscoelastic" but use different viscoelasticity parameters for each of them.

    As you can see, every possible combination is available, you just need to decide which model you would like to implement.

    Best,

    Gerard

  3. #3
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    Hi Professor Ateshian,

    Is it possible to define that the viscoelastic coefficients, gi, vary with strain?

    Regards,
    Alexander

  4. #4
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    Hi Alexander,

    No, the "viscoelastic" material analyzes quasilinear viscoelasticity, which means that the relaxation functions cannot be strain-dependent.

    The "reactive viscoelastic" material can accommodate strain-dependent relaxation functions, but it is computationally very expensive (it needs to remember every time step, which means the analysis slows down as time increases).

    Best,

    Gerard

  5. #5
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    Hi Professor Ateshian,

    Thank you for your fast reply. I just know the basics, but this paper looks interesting for saving time in computations https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0190137.

    Regards,
    Alexander

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Hi Alexander,

    This is great, thanks for sharing this link. I will look into it.

    Best,

    Gerard

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